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child custody & support Archives

Child custody, visitation, and parental interference

Although money can be an important consideration in divorce, many Californians are most concerned about protecting their relationship with their children. Sometimes couples are able to resolve child custody and visitation issues through settlement negotiations. Other times the matter has to be litigated. Regardless of how it is resolved, though, the issue can still become problematic from time-to-time, sometimes requiring additional legal action.

California firm helping address child support issues

Regardless of whether you're a custodial or noncustodial parent, the outcome of a child support dispute can shape the financial well-being of you and your child. As we discussed last week, there are limited circumstances under which child support can be stopped, but there are many instances when a child support modification is warranted. Whether you are seeking to increase or decrease a support obligation, you need to be prepared for a fight, as very rarely do parents agree on an appropriate amount of monthly child support.

Cessation and modification of child support

Child support can be a massive financial obligation for Californians. This is especially true for those who have multiple children, children with extensive needs, and those who have an insignificant income. There are a variety of factors that can affect child support, many of which can change over time. This means that child support modification, one direction or the other, is often justified. But when can a child support obligation be ended?

Child support and the income withholding order

Raising a child is extremely expensive. Even families with moderate incomes can face difficulty making ends meet, so when couples divorce and a custodial parent must suddenly burden all costs associated with raising a child, one's financial situation can become dire. Fortunately, the state of California recognizes that the cost of child rearing should be shared by both parents. As great as that may sound, many custodial parents struggle to recoup money from a noncustodial parent, even if child custody is ordered.

Child custody, visitation, and the parenting agreement

Depending on the parties involved and the issues at hand, divorce can either be highly contentious or amicably resolved with little need for court intrusion. However, simply because a couple gets along does not mean that they can relax during the divorce process. Those who do may find themselves at the losing end of what is essentially a bargain.

We know how to find evidence to support your child custody case

Family dynamics can vary significantly depending on the people involved, their financial circumstances, and any number of other factors. When it comes to divorce, these dynamics can have a significant impact on how certain issues are addressed. For example, as we discussed last week, those who are in relationships where domestic violence occurs may be able to use evidence of that violence to buttress their case for sole physical and legal custody, as well as to limit the other parent's visitation.

Domestic violence can impact child custody matters

Domestic violence is far more common than most Californians realize. Too many individuals, both male and female, are exposed to physical violence, as well as verbal and emotional aggression that leaves them seriously harmed, afraid for their safety, and forever damaged. Making matters worse is that fact that an estimated 15 million children live in homes where domestic violence occurs.

The various penalties for nonpayment of child support

Regardless of whether a Californian is on the receiving or paying end of child support, the matter can become quite difficult. Custodial parents may struggle when they fail to receive the support they are owed, and noncustodial parents may find themselves facing their own financial stressors when their obligation is more than they can afford. Yet, the penalties for failing to pay child support can be much harsher than the financial strain it can place on a noncustodial parent.

We funnel emotions into strong family law arguments

A few weeks ago we discussed the legal importance of paternity. Whether you think you are the father of a child and want to secure your father's rights or a mother looking to collect child support, this issue can be crucial to you and your family's future. The same holds true for all child custody and child support issues. Relocation can be a contentious issue where careers and relationships can be put at risk, and custody modification battles can leave parents fighting over what they believe is in their child's best interest.

What is paternity and why is it important?

When it comes to family law issues, most individuals consider issues regarding their children to be the most important. Whether an individual is dealing with child custody and visitation, child support, or even property division, thinking of one's children can reshape how these critical issues are approached. For many Californians, though, these matters may not even be addressed until paternity is established.

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